We got enough crazy to go around

srafandseedpods:

OH MY GOD one of our tigers did this (and it isn’t stuck on his head; one of the keepers went in to see if he needed help and he undid this and redid it on his own a few times) but oh my god hE’S PRETENDING TO BE A LION IM GONNA DIE

jungie14295:

Frozen/Mean Girls crossover

I can’t stop laughing now

pjcalamity:

I haven’t laughed so hard in forever.


@

pjcalamity:

I haven’t laughed so hard in forever.

@

party-in-the-morgue:

party-in-the-morgue:

What if prisons let prisoners take their own mug shots?

Cellfies

scalestails:

caring4theunconventionalcritter:

scalestails:

CRESTED GECKO CARE
This is by no means a complete guide, just a simple overview with a lot of neat sources.
Crested geckos (formerly Rhacodactylus ciliatus now Correlophus ciliatus) are a nocturnal frugivorus gecko native to New Caledonia, an island east of Australia. They were actually thought extinct until the 1994, where it was rediscovered after a tropical storm! Now it is a commonly kept pet in the United States and Europe. Easily bred in captivity, these moderately sized geckos adapt to life in captivity very well.  
Housing
Crested geckos are arboreal, meaning they spend most of their time above ground in the trees and amongst the foliage up there. Because of this, height is important. A juvenile crested gecko can be housed in a 10 gallon aquarium (20x10x12) turned on it’s side (so it is taller than it is wide) or one of many terrariums built specifically for reptiles. A single adult does well in a 20x high (20x11x24) And a pair may be housed in a 29 gallon (30 x 12 x 18) or glass terrarium of similar dimensions.
A good terrarium has many silk or live plants to provide cover and horizontal perches. A naturalistic look can be achieved by using commercially sold silk plants and driftwood/cork bark but an inexpensive terrarium can be made by using silk plants bought from the dollar store (glitter and fragrance free) and PVC pipe. Make sure all enclosures have a ventilated lid that is locked in place and that any doors and openings are escape proof.
Substrate can be paper towels, coco coir, cypress wood mulch, fir wood mulch, organic potting soil, peat, sphagnum moss, and commercial substrates sold specifically for cresties.
Here is a list of live plants that are safe and not safe for rhacodactylus and cresties. http://www.pangeareptile.com/forums/showthread.php?38868-Plants-master-list-%28rhac-safe%29
Here is an example of a cheap home made crestie terrarium made from a plastic tub. http://youtu.be/zPwzUM-GdK4
A well set up naturalistic terrarium:

A well set up inexpensive terrarium:

Diet
DO NOT FEED YOUR CRESTED GECKO BABY FOOD
Let me repeat that, DO NOT FEED YOUR CRESTED GECKO BABY FOOD
A crestie fed nothing but baby food WILL develop metabolic bone disease (MBD) and WILL die. It is not a complete diet for them. At absolute most, you can give them a few licks as a treat but overall just stay away from the stuff.
In the wild they are frugivores, eating mainly figs, fruit, and insects. In captivity recreating this diet at home can be difficult. There are three major methods of feeding.
Crested gecko diet only. This is the easiest method and all it includes is the commercially made food Crested Gecko Diet made by Repashy Superfoods. http://www.pangeareptile.com/store/crested-gecko-diet.html It’s really the best out there. It comes in a powder you mix with water and is a complete diet, no insects or supplements are required.
Crested gecko diet and crickets/fruit. This diet revolves around feeding crested gecko diet daily, but also including crickets (dusted with calcium powder) or roaches (also with powder) once a week or so with the occasional fruit puree added to their usual food. This is my preferred method.
Home made diet. This can only be attempted by experienced reptile keepers who have a good knowledge or reptile and crested gecko nutrition, their diet in the wild, vitamins and minerals and how they interact, and a good feel for how healthy their gecko is and when to change up their food. Do not try this if you’ve never had a crested gecko before and if you’re not a professional. Just don’t.
Heating and Lighting
Crested geckos, being nocturnal, do not need UVB lighting. In fact, too much UVB is bad for their health and should be avoided. All calcium and vitamin D3 needs can be met with a healthy diet instead of UVB lighting.
They also cannot get too hot, ideally your daytime temperatures should be 73-78F and should not exceed 80F. A night time drop into the 60s is acceptable. Because of this, heating the entire room is generally very easy and most of the time cresties can be kept at room temperature. However, in colder climates and during the winter you may need a low wattage UVA (heat) light to keep them warm.
Humidity
A general humidity level of 50% should be maintained at all times, with a daily spike of 100%. This can be achieved by spraying daily. Always let the enclosure dry out between mistings to avoid mold.
Handling
Their personality varies, but most crested geckos tolerate handling well enough. They are not, however,  something that should be handled too often. They do not “tame down” with repeated or prolonged daily handling. Indeed, too much time outside the enclosure and in your hands stresses them greatly, possibly even causing them to drop their tail. This generally happens when they are startled or the tail gets pinched. Unlike other geckos, it does not grow back.
If you have a recently acquired gecko, or have one that is flighty and scared let them settle in for a week before attempting any bonding. Once that time has passed handle them for 5 minutes daily for several weeks and if they calm down (some won’t, this is simply their personality) you can extend the handling to 15 minutes.
Sources and good reads:
Probably the best care sheet out there: http://www.pangeareptile.com/store/crested-gecko-care-sheet-en.html
http://www.reptilechannel.com/care-sheets/crested-gecko.aspx
Another comprehensive care page: http://www.rhac-shack.co.uk/2.html
http://www.pet-care-portal.com/crested-gecko.html
A great online resource for supplies: http://www.neherpetoculture.com/supplies

Reblogging because I actually have space for one of these guys <3 It will be my birthday present to me!

Aaaaaaw yis!

scalestails:

caring4theunconventionalcritter:

scalestails:

CRESTED GECKO CARE

This is by no means a complete guide, just a simple overview with a lot of neat sources.

Crested geckos (formerly Rhacodactylus ciliatus now Correlophus ciliatusare a nocturnal frugivorus gecko native to New Caledonia, an island east of Australia. They were actually thought extinct until the 1994, where it was rediscovered after a tropical storm! Now it is a commonly kept pet in the United States and Europe. Easily bred in captivity, these moderately sized geckos adapt to life in captivity very well.  

Housing


Crested geckos are arboreal, meaning they spend most of their time above ground in the trees and amongst the foliage up there. Because of this, height is important. A juvenile crested gecko can be housed in a 10 gallon aquarium (20x10x12) turned on it’s side (so it is taller than it is wide) or one of many terrariums built specifically for reptiles. A single adult does well in a 20x high (20x11x24) And a pair may be housed in a 29 gallon (30 x 12 x 18) or glass terrarium of similar dimensions.

A good terrarium has many silk or live plants to provide cover and horizontal perches. A naturalistic look can be achieved by using commercially sold silk plants and driftwood/cork bark but an inexpensive terrarium can be made by using silk plants bought from the dollar store (glitter and fragrance free) and PVC pipe. Make sure all enclosures have a ventilated lid that is locked in place and that any doors and openings are escape proof.

Substrate can be paper towels, coco coir, cypress wood mulch, fir wood mulch, organic potting soil, peat, sphagnum moss, and commercial substrates sold specifically for cresties.

Here is a list of live plants that are safe and not safe for rhacodactylus and cresties. http://www.pangeareptile.com/forums/showthread.php?38868-Plants-master-list-%28rhac-safe%29

Here is an example of a cheap home made crestie terrarium made from a plastic tub. http://youtu.be/zPwzUM-GdK4

A well set up naturalistic terrarium:

A well set up inexpensive terrarium:

Diet


DO NOT FEED YOUR CRESTED GECKO BABY FOOD

Let me repeat that, DO NOT FEED YOUR CRESTED GECKO BABY FOOD

A crestie fed nothing but baby food WILL develop metabolic bone disease (MBD) and WILL die. It is not a complete diet for them. At absolute most, you can give them a few licks as a treat but overall just stay away from the stuff.

In the wild they are frugivores, eating mainly figs, fruit, and insects. In captivity recreating this diet at home can be difficult. There are three major methods of feeding.

  • Crested gecko diet only. This is the easiest method and all it includes is the commercially made food Crested Gecko Diet made by Repashy Superfoods. http://www.pangeareptile.com/store/crested-gecko-diet.html It’s really the best out there. It comes in a powder you mix with water and is a complete diet, no insects or supplements are required.
  • Crested gecko diet and crickets/fruit. This diet revolves around feeding crested gecko diet daily, but also including crickets (dusted with calcium powder) or roaches (also with powder) once a week or so with the occasional fruit puree added to their usual food. This is my preferred method.
  • Home made diet. This can only be attempted by experienced reptile keepers who have a good knowledge or reptile and crested gecko nutrition, their diet in the wild, vitamins and minerals and how they interact, and a good feel for how healthy their gecko is and when to change up their food. Do not try this if you’ve never had a crested gecko before and if you’re not a professional. Just don’t.

Heating and Lighting

Crested geckos, being nocturnal, do not need UVB lighting. In fact, too much UVB is bad for their health and should be avoided. All calcium and vitamin D3 needs can be met with a healthy diet instead of UVB lighting.

They also cannot get too hot, ideally your daytime temperatures should be 73-78F and should not exceed 80F. A night time drop into the 60s is acceptable. Because of this, heating the entire room is generally very easy and most of the time cresties can be kept at room temperature. However, in colder climates and during the winter you may need a low wattage UVA (heat) light to keep them warm.

Humidity

A general humidity level of 50% should be maintained at all times, with a daily spike of 100%. This can be achieved by spraying daily. Always let the enclosure dry out between mistings to avoid mold.

Handling

Their personality varies, but most crested geckos tolerate handling well enough. They are not, however,  something that should be handled too often. They do not “tame down” with repeated or prolonged daily handling. Indeed, too much time outside the enclosure and in your hands stresses them greatly, possibly even causing them to drop their tail. This generally happens when they are startled or the tail gets pinched. Unlike other geckos, it does not grow back.

If you have a recently acquired gecko, or have one that is flighty and scared let them settle in for a week before attempting any bonding. Once that time has passed handle them for 5 minutes daily for several weeks and if they calm down (some won’t, this is simply their personality) you can extend the handling to 15 minutes.

Sources and good reads:

Probably the best care sheet out there: http://www.pangeareptile.com/store/crested-gecko-care-sheet-en.html

http://www.reptilechannel.com/care-sheets/crested-gecko.aspx

Another comprehensive care page: http://www.rhac-shack.co.uk/2.html

http://www.pet-care-portal.com/crested-gecko.html


A great online resource for supplies: http://www.neherpetoculture.com/supplies

Reblogging because I actually have space for one of these guys <3 It will be my birthday present to me!

Aaaaaaw yis!